Planning Reform UK
Promoting clarity in the UK Planning System

KEY TOPICS

Our list of current projects is shown below - with more to follow.         Please scroll down to view all items.

  1. Clarification of the word "isolated" as used in the NPPF.
    The definition of the word "isolated" is vital in the determination of rural planning applications. Applicants and agents need a sound definition in order to determine if a proposed application has a fair chance of success. Decision makers need a sound definition in order to provide fair, consistent & predictable decisions and to avoid charges of capricious behaviour.
    NEWS UPDATE  (3 April 2015) : Following a Freedom Of Information request submitted by Planning Reform UK, the Planning Advisory Service  have stated that they have NO definition for the NPPF word "isolated".
    NEWS UPDATE  (3 April 2015) : Following a Freedom Of Information request submitted by Planning Reform UK, the Planning Inspectorate  have stated that they have NO definition for the NPPF word "isolated".

  1. Clarification of the word "sustainable" as used in the NPPF.
    The definition of the word "sustainable" is vital in the determination of planning applications - especially those in rural areas. Applicants and agents need a sound definition in order to determine if a proposed application has a fair chance of success. Decision makers need a sound definition in order to provide fair, consistent & predictable decisions and to avoid charges of capricious behaviour.

  1. Clarification of the respective importance of single dwelling proposals and larger estate proposals.
    Is a single new-build house less "worthy" than a house which is part of an estate? If a planning difference exists between a new home in a small development and a new home on a large development, then the planning law should be soundly explained.

  1. Clarification that local planning authorities can restrict new housing allocation sites to those containing 5 or more new-build dwellings.
    Some Local Authorities will not consider housing developments of four dwellings or fewer. Is this an attempt to ensure that each new build will contribute to the council finances? (A new build will incur council fees of about 15000 per home - but only if the development is for five homes or more). The legality of this situation needs to be confirmed.

  1. Clarification of the relationship of Class MB Barn Conversions to the NPPF. Specifically, do Class MB applications have to be "sustainable" and not "isolated"? In other words can the standard NPPF rules be used by councils to block the new Class MB regulations?
    NEWS UPDATE  (9 March 2015) : After extensive lobbying by Planning Reform UK and many others, the Class MB barn conversion rules have been clarified. No longer can the NPPF 'sustainability' and 'isolated' rules be used by decision makers to block such conversions. For details click HERE

  1. Clarification of the word "piecemeal" as used in some 2015 Secretary of State planning decisions.
    These decisions were refusals on the basic that the developments in question constituted "piecemeal" development.
    NEWS UPDATE  (3 April 2015) : Following a Freedom Of Information request submitted by Planning Reform UK, the DCLG have stated that the word "piecemeal" is NOT a standard planning term. However the Secretary of State in March 2015 issued planning refusals which relied on the concept of "piecemeal development" as a refusal reason.  This suggests that the Secretary of State can invent laws & terminology in order  to force through any acceptance or refusal that he/she wants.

  1. Clarification of the costs of the overall planning system.
    One aim of this information collection exercise is to identify the total governmental planning cost which can be assigned to each new build home.
    NEWS UPDATE  (3 April 2015) : Following a Freedom Of Information request submitted by Planning Reform UK,  the Planning Advisory Service has provided a breakdown of their running cost etc.